All in Mindset

On Mothering Yourself

While we all at some point had mothers, not all of us do today. And not all of us had good mothers. And some are grieving never becoming a mother. For me, my illness stole from me the chance to be a mom - something I desperately wanted ever since I was conscious of what being a mother was. One way to heal from these types of deep wounds is to learn how to mother yourself. Here are ten aspects of mothering and how you can mothering yourself

On Being Seen on Capitol Hill

This past Wednesday, April 3rd, I participated in Advocacy Day sponsored by Solve ME/CFS and MEAction. I joined over 234 other advocates who spread out over Capitol Hill to more than 224 Senate and House offices to change minds through personal stories, education and facts. Advocacy is empowering. Not everyone is able to channel their anger at the injustice into advocacy and certainly the sickest in our society are often TOO sick to fight for justice.

Why I Stay Alive

The other day I was scrolling through my favorite photos on my phone, and I rediscovered this quote I took a screen shot of back in December 2015. I loved the ideas and suggestions, but I had no idea who wrote it.  A little googling revealed that Matt Haig was the author. Inspired by his work, I made a list of reasons to stay alive. I encourage you to do so too.

Don't Go to War

“Cancer, you are going to lose and we are going to win,” declares a commercial for a prominent cancer hospital. The message personifies the illness, lists all the losses (relatives and hair) and a face then declares: “I won’t let you.” The cancer is cast in a fraught adversarial relationship. Often illness feels like an epic struggle with life and death at stake. It is one. We are embattled. Treating illness as an enemy does not work.

How to Help a Friend Who's Sick

I’ve had fibromyalgia since I was 34. When I turned 50, I marked that milestone with a celebration FOR my friends ― the people who hold my hand figuratively (and yes, sometimes literally). Because their love, support and understanding have kept me alive. When you have a chronic condition, friends are pivotal. Don’t have a clue how to help? Never fear; I’ve got 10 concrete suggestions.

What I Wish I Knew

In my early 30s, in the prime of my life, I got sick. I got mysteriously and seriously sick. My world went upside down and tossed me around. I confronted the hard fact that there’s a big difference between a treatment and a cure, and it turned out doctors could offer me neither. Weeks stretched to months stretched to years, and more years and more years and more years. Now decades. At the age of 52, looking back, here is what I know now that I wished I knew then, half a lifetime ago.

Are You One of the Millions Missing?

This past Saturday, on May 12th, Washington DC joined over 100 cities worldwide to call on governments and health officials to take critical action for people living with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, commonly known as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

I spearheaded the DC Millions Missing event, sponsored by MEAction, which was held at the Freedom Plaza at 13th and Pennsylvania, between the White House and the U.S. Capitol. 

Braving the Storm of Illness

What does the wilderness mean for those who live with chronic and/or invisible illness? Brené Brown talks about how theologians and poets and musicians and writers uses the wilderness as a metaphor. When we become ill, we are shoved into the wilderness. It’s a storm in the wilderness, often a perilous one. Unlike most, we don’t have a choice. We enter a vast and treacherous place and are navigating trials and obstacles in our quest for physical recovery.